Workers’ Cottages – Longview Farm

This is the ninth post in a multi-part series about Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

A view of the cottages in 1916 from the north.

A view of the cottages in 1916 from the north.

General Info:

  • Built: 1914
  • Modifications: Minor
  • Disused: Early 1960s
  • Razed: Early 1980s
  • Size: 24′ x 32′
  • Location: In the middle of Longview Lake
  • Listed on NRHP: No

Location map. The workers' cottages are the buildings next to 41.

Location map. The workers’ cottages are the buildings next to 41.

Function and Features

These were simple cottages meant for farm workers, and perhaps their spouses. The original plan was to use them to house married workers. The cottages were built to be identical. The cottages only had one bedroom, so there was no room for children. The other three rooms in the cottage were the kitchen, living room, and dining room.

What made these seemingly ordinary accommodations unique from others of the era? Each of these cottages had a 13′ by 7′ porch that was unique to the particular cottage to give it a sense of originality, and they were equipped with hot water — a very modern convenience in the 1910s.

In the 1940s, Cottage 2 burnt and was rebuilt. In the photo of it below, the differences in the newer structure are hardly noticeable unless you really look for them. The gable window above the porch in this house is square instead of arched. The roof beams are also not exposed in the rebuilt structure.

Sometime around the 1960s, as the farm downsized, the cottages were abandoned. With the coming of Longview Lake in the early 1980s, the cottages were demolished.

Below is an architectural drawing of the site, as well as the typical floor plan. Also below are pictures of the north (front) side of each cottage. I would not normally include so many pictures in a post, but having these pictures show how each cottage has its own subtle styling to differentiate it from the others.

A detailed drawing of the cottage site and floor plan. Cottage 1 is on the left, Cottage 6 is on the right.

A detailed drawing of the cottage site and floor plan. Cottage 1 is on the left, Cottage 6 is on the right.

 

Cottage 1

Cottage 1. Hip roof on porch supported by box columns.

 

Cottage 2

Cottage 2. Gable roof on porch supported by box columns.

 

Cottage 3

Cottage 3. Shed roof on porch supported by stuccoed walls.

 

Cottage 4

Cottage 4. Hip roof of porch supported with box columns. Railing and balusters on porch.

 

Cottage 5

Cottage 5. Shed roof on porch supported by brackets. Also has rails and balusters.

 

Cottage 6

Cottage 6. Shed roof on porch supported by stuccoed walls with exposed rafters and an arch.

Today

They were located very close to Mouse Creek, which forms the east fork of Longview Lake. This location meant that they wound up under quite a bit of water.

Additional Photos

The southwest room of a cottage, the kitchen.

The southwest room of a cottage, the kitchen.

Southwest facade of a cottage.

Southwest facade of a cottage.

South facades of a couple cottages.

South facades of a couple cottages.

Northwest room of a cottage.

Northwest room of a cottage.

There were some outbuildings near the cottages.

There were some outbuildings near the cottages.

East side of Cottage 1.

East side of Cottage 1.

Photo Credits
All of these photos were taken by David J. Kaminsky in August 1978 as part of HABS. The architectural drawing was prepared a year later for HABS.

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