• Entrance Gates or Arches – Longview Farm

    This is the sixth post in a multi-part series about Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

    The North Arch as it appears today. (1)

    General Info (for both):

    • Built: 1914
    • Modifications: Both have been moved from original locations; East Arch has been reconstructed. Both have had text changed from “Longview Farm” to “New Longview”. At least one arch had “Welcome” sign at one point.
    • Disused: Still in use
    • Razed: Still in use
    • Size: About 14′ 6″ clearance, can fit a narrow two-lane road underneath.
    • Original Locations: 100 ft. south of Longview Rd. and View High Dr. intersection on Longview Rd. (North), eastern boundary of farm on Longview Rd., which lines up with the eastern edge of the Longview subdivision now. (East)
    • Current Locations: Directly in front of Hawthorn Bank (North), Near corner of Longview Rd. and Redbuck Cir. (East)
    • Listed on NRHP?: Yes, both arches

    Function and Features

    A 1920's view of the East Arch looking into the farm from the west. (2)

    The Entrance Arches, also known as the Entrance Gates, were built by Long to create an opulent entrance to the farm. They introduced guests to the unified architecture of the farm. The arches have remained relatively unchanged architecturally, but are the only structures in the farm that have been moved for preservation.

    At some point, ownership of the arches was transferred to the City of Lee’s Summit. The city never did maintenance on the arches despite owning them, and were likely kept from deteriorating completely by the owners of the farm. The arches would need repairs, as being a narrow spot in the road left them vulnerable to being hit by vehicles. Longview Community College tried to obtain one of the arches in 1992 and then again around 2001, but both times they apparently fell short of fundraising goals. They would have needed about $145,000 to move the North Arch to their campus. It was clear by that time that the arches would either need to be removed or demolished with the impending creation of a parkway through Longview. On November 22, 2002, a truck carrying a crane crashed into the East Arch, causing serious damage. It appeared the arch might have to be salvaged, but it was mostly intact when it was moved to its current location. This also changed plans for the North Arch, which was to remain over the one lane portion of Longview Road at View High Drive. The accident made it clear that this would not work, and the North Arch was moved in late 2003.

    The reconstructed East Arch in its current location. (3)

     

    Today

    The arches still remain as iconic entrances to the farm. Since both have been moved to New Longview property, the text atop the arches has been updated to reflect the change.

    Additional Photographs

     

    North Arch showing Hawthorn Bank in the background. (4)

    View of East Arch looking east in 1978. (5)

    View of East Arch looking east in 1985. (6)

    Photo Credits
    (1) Me, October 2011.
    (2) Anderson Photography Co., HABS, 1920’s.
    (3) Me, June 2011.
    (4) Me.
    (5) David Kaminsky, HABS, August 1978.
    (6) Piland-Uguccioni, NHRP, June 1985.

  • Colt Barn – Longview Farm

    This is the fifth post in a multi-part series about Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

    An old view of the Colt Barn.

    General Info:

    • Built: 1914
    • Modifications?: None known.
    • Disused: After 1934
    • Razed: About 1970
    • Size: 60′ x 50′
    • Location: .  38°53’39.64″N  94°27’23.04″W.  About 1,100 to 1,200 feet southeast of Work Horse Barn complex.
    • Listed on NRHP?: No

    Location of Colt Barn (34). See the "Map" entry for what other items mean.

    Function and Features

    The Colt barn was used to house colts until nearly all the horses were sold in 1934. It is unclear what happened to the barn for years afterwards. It was torn down around 1970, so HABS has very little information about the barn.

    The center of the barn has the typical barn shape, but the outside edges are flanked by what appears to be about half a dozen stalls on each side. It also looks like each stall has a door to the outside.

    Today

    The location is under a lot of water.

    Photo Credits

    Anderson Photography Co., HABS, 1920’s.
    Map excerpt comes from a map prepared by Darl Rastorfer, 1978 and edited by me.

  • Brood Mare Manager’s House – Longview Farm

    This is the fourth post in a multi-part series about Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

    Brood Mare Manager's House in foreground, Horse Trainer's House in background.

    General Info:

    • Built: early 1920’s
    • Modifications?: None known
    • Disused: Unknown
    • Razed: 1996
    • Size: 35′ x 55′, one and a half stories.
    • Location:  2808 and 2812 SW 10th St.
    • Listed on NRHP?: No

    Map showing Broad Mare Manager's House and surrounding area as of 1978.

    Function and Features

    Unlike many of the buildings at Longview Farm, the Brood Mare Manager’s house was built after the farm was completed. This residence would serve its official capacity for only a few short years, as the brood mares would be sold of by 1935. It appears the residence was just changed into residence for anyone at the farm afterwards. In 1978, Mr. Clarence Aldrich was occupying the residence. I am sure The Longview We Remember has an account of when he moved out and how long he had been there. This post will be revised when I figure that out.

    By the 1990’s, the Longview subdivision would be encroaching on the vicinity of this house. Sometime during 1996, it was torn down and a new house was going up in the same spot by the next spring. While it would have been nice to keep an old house in a residential neighborhood, it was simply too small to blend in well with the rest of the neighborhood.

    The house was in line with many of the residences on Longview Farm. It had a few small rooms and  a screened in front porch. There isn’t too much architecturally interesting.

    The west side of the house, showing the windowed-in porch.

    Today

    2808 and 2812 SW 10th St. It would rest up against 2812 and extend to halfway across 2808’s driveway. Current houses are about double the width.

    Additional Photographs

     

    Furnishings inside the house, which was still occupied in 1978.

    Photo Credits

    All photos were taken by David J. Kaminsky for HABS, August 1978.
    The map excerpt comes from a map prepared by Darl Rastorfer, 1978 and edited by me.

  • Brood Mare Barn – Longview Farm

    This is the third post in a multi-part series about Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

     

    Looking at the south and east sides of the barn.

    General Info:

    • Built: 1914
    • Modifications?: Converted from horse to cattle use about 1935.
    • Disused: Likely around 1957.
    • Razed: Sometime between 1990 and 1996
    • Size: 45′ x 110′, one story with loft
    • Location (relative to today’s surroundings): 2813 SW 10th St. The barn would cover the west side of the house and extend north a bit and south to the current property line.
    • Listed on NRHP?: No

    Map showing Broad Mare Barn and surrounding area as of 1978.

    Function and Features

    The Brood Mare Barn was originally a place to house horses that share the same name. In 1935, the Brood mare horses were sold off along with the rest of the horses except the hackneys. Dairy operations expanded to take over the barn. It’s not clear if the beef operation continued to use the barn, but either way it was abandoned in 1957 with the end of the cattle business at the farm.

    For some reason, the entire Broad Mare complex was left off of the NRHP nomination. Sometime between 1990 and 1996, the barn was torn down, as it was then right in the middle of the Longview subdivision. It was likely in an advanced state of deterioration at the time of its demolition and rehabilitation would have been cost prohibitive. Still could have served as a nice clubhouse for the subdivision.

    One of the brood broad sides of the barn.

    Among the barns, the Brood Mare Barn was probably the least ornate and architecturally bland. Only the single cupola in the middle set this barn apart from the standard barn. The barn was 10 bays long, and there are ten windows on each side of the building.

    Today

    Two houses cover up any trace of the barn. It looks like many of the trees on the southeast side of 2813 SW 10th St. were close to the east side of the barn, which is why they may look a bit more mature when compared to other trees in the area.

    Additional Photographs

     

    Southwest side.

    North side. Note the power lines.

    Inside the barn.

    Photo Credits

    All photos were taken by David J. Kaminsky for HABS, August 1978.
    The map excerpt comes from a map prepared by Darl Rastorfer, 1978 and edited by me.